Linguistic convenience

Linguistic convenience at its finest, Aussies need to educate our ‘Merican mates, so here’s a start 
1. “Can’t Be Bothered”
There is no easy American phrase that explains that “I could do that, but no, no I don’t think I will do that, just because I don’t feel like it.” Can’t Be Bothered uses minimal effort to express minimal effort.
2. “My Shout”
Meaning: “I’ve got this round, or I’ve got the tab.” Aussies are great at not splitting checks, and just taking turns paying for things.
3. “Mates”
Why should mating just be for the Discovery Channel? There’s nothing like a night out with your mates.
4. “Uni”
Seriously, why do we even say college? If you aren’t going to a community college, you’re going to a university. They call it “uni” because that’s what it is.
5. “Sus it Out”
The “sus” is when something or someone is being suspicious and the Australian ladies are gossip about someone/thing sus.
6. “No Dramas,” “No Worries”
It’s like saying “take a chill pill” or “you’re welcome” or “it’s going to be alright” all at the same time.
7. “What a Beaut”
There are so many beautiful people in Australia, they must have just needed a quicker way to say beautiful… after all, they have to say it so often.
8. “Bloody Oath”
Meaning: “That’s the truth.” But it just sounds so cute when they say it, that you want to believe them (regardless of whether or not they’re lying).
9. “Brekky”
No one wants to say “breakfast” that early in the morning. Seriously, coffee is already two syllables, we don’t need two more; brekky will do.
10. “Mucking Around”
Fooling around sounds too much like fun. Mucking around, that’s when you know they’re getting into trouble.
11. “I’m knackered”
Exhausted sounds like you’ve collapsed. But knackered sounds like someone took an iron club to your back until you couldn’t work anymore. Just saying, sometimes we’re that tired.
12. “Taking a Sickie” or “Chucking a Sickie”
You know, “playing hooky,” except it sounds more believable.

Linguistic convenience at its finest, Aussies need to educate our 'Merican mates, so here's a start ;)
1. "Can't Be Bothered"
There is no easy American phrase that explains that "I could do that, but no, no I don't think I will do that, just because I don't feel like it." Can't Be Bothered uses minimal effort to express minimal effort.
2. "My Shout"
Meaning: "I've got this round, or I've got the tab." Aussies are great at not splitting checks, and just taking turns paying for things.
3. "Mates"
Why should mating just be for the Discovery Channel? There's nothing like a night out with your mates.
4. "Uni"
Seriously, why do we even say college? If you aren't going to a community college, you're going to a university. They call it "uni" because that's what it is.
5. "Sus it Out"
The "sus" is when something or someone is being suspicious and the Australian ladies are gossip about someone/thing sus.
6. "No Dramas," "No Worries"
It's like saying "take a chill pill" or "you're welcome" or "it's going to be alright" all at the same time.
7. "What a Beaut"
There are so many beautiful people in Australia, they must have just needed a quicker way to say beautiful... after all, they have to say it so often.
8. "Bloody Oath"
Meaning: "That's the truth." But it just sounds so cute when they say it, that you want to believe them (regardless of whether or not they're lying).
9. "Brekky"
No one wants to say "breakfast" that early in the morning. Seriously, coffee is already two syllables, we don't need two more; brekky will do.
10. "Mucking Around"
Fooling around sounds too much like fun. Mucking around, that's when you know they're getting into trouble.
11. "I'm knackered"
Exhausted sounds like you've collapsed. But knackered sounds like someone took an iron club to your back until you couldn't work anymore. Just saying, sometimes we're that tired.
12. "Taking a Sickie" or "Chucking a Sickie"
You know, "playing hooky," except it sounds more believable.
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